You might recognize Cincinnati-based brand Queen City Hemp for their popular CBD seltzer, but we recommend their tasty and potent CBD oil tinctures. The full-spectrum CBD used in this tincture is sourced from hemp plants grown in accordance with organic practices from USA suppliers. You'll find only three ingredients in this tincture: Fractionated coconut oil, peppermint oil for flavor, and hemp extracts.
Cannabidiol (CBD) is a naturally-occurring compound found in cannabis. It’s known for therapeutic properties and has no psychoactive effects. CBD oil is typically extracted from cannabis plants using either CO2 or ethanol extraction methods. It’s then incorporated into common CBD oil products, including tinctures (drops), vape liquids, gummies, capsules and topical creams and lotions. CBD oil derived from hemp has less than 0.3% THC so is federally legal in the U.S. and can be purchased online or in some local stores. CBD oil derived from marijuana has more than 0.3% THC so can only be purchased at licensed dispensaries in states where medical marijuana is legal.

Another very common issue is acne. During the teenage years it occurs more frequently, but adults suffer with it also. In fact, 15% of acne sufferers are adults and some suffer from it chronically. There are numerous washes, creams and pills that might help with suppressing acne symptoms, but CBD might provide beneficial relief that offers permanent treatment for this issue rather than just a temporary solution.
Full spectrum CBD oil products have the advantage of containing many different cannabinoids and terpenes and the potential for a wider health reach. A recent study indicated the synergistic effects of a full spectrum CBD oil were superior to an isolate in the effective treatment of inflammatory conditions. Terpenes alone have shown incredible potential for human health and should not be disregarded.
Textile expert Elizabeth Wayland Barber summarizes the historical evidence that Cannabis sativa, "grew and was known in the Neolithic period all across the northern latitudes, from Europe (Germany, Switzerland, Austria, Romania, Ukraine) to East Asia (Tibet and China)," but, "textile use of Cannabis sativa does not surface for certain in the West until relatively late, namely the Iron Age."[111] "I strongly suspect, however, that what catapulted hemp to sudden fame and fortune as a cultigen and caused it to spread rapidly westwards in the first millennium B.C. was the spread of the habit of pot-smoking from somewhere in south-central Asia, where the drug-bearing variety of the plant originally occurred. The linguistic evidence strongly supports this theory, both as to time and direction of spread and as to cause."[112]
This is probably the most common question and perhaps the most difficult to answer. CBD is believed to interact with our own cannabinoid system, which means how we interact with CBD individually depends on our tolerance as well as our immunity. Therefore, one dose may work for one person and not the other. Surprisingly, it has nothing to do with weight, but once again our own system. This is why our physician recommends starting low and slow until you achieve the results you are looking for with the oil.
Hemp is a variety of Cannabis sativa and is of the same plant species as marijuana, yet , hemp is genetically different and distinguished by use and chemical compound makeup. The Industrial Hemp Program registers growers of hemp and samples the crop to verify that the THC concentration does not exceed 0.3% on dry weight basis, while Cannabis grown for marijuana can contain anywhere from 6 or 7 % to 20% or even more. That’s the long answer on the difference between industrial hemp and marijuana. The short answer is that you could consume a field of organic hemp and wouldn’t be high.

Although cannabis as a drug and industrial hemp both derive from the species Cannabis sativa and contain the psychoactive component tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), they are distinct strains with unique phytochemical compositions and uses.[7] Hemp has lower concentrations of THC and higher concentrations of cannabidiol (CBD), which decreases or eliminates its psychoactive effects.[7] The legality of industrial hemp varies widely between countries. Some governments regulate the concentration of THC and permit only hemp that is bred with an especially low THC content.[8][9]
According to the results of a study published in Neuropharmacology, CBD oil can help reduce the risk of developing diabetes. The research sought to find out the effect of CBD on non-obese, diabetes-prone females mice. Only 32% of the mice administered with CBD contracted diabetes in comparison to 100% of the group that didn’t receive a CBD injection.
The results “suggest CBD to be a potential treatment for nicotine addiction,” the study authors wrote—but they also admit that their findings are preliminary. Ryan Vandrey, PhD, a cannabis researcher and associate professor of psychiatry at Johns Hopkins University (who was not involved in the 2013 study), agrees that larger, longer-term studies are needed to know if CBD might be helpful for smokers looking to kick the habit.
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